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Home » Eye Care Services » Eye Disease Management » Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetes is associated with several eye health issues including cataracts and glaucoma, but the most well known diabetic eye disease is diabetic retinopathy.

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is an eye disease that only affects diabetics. It is the #1 cause of blindness in the working class in the U.S. It occurs when the fragile vascular network that supplies the retina – the light sensitive tissue at the back of the eye that helps us see – begins to swell or leak. During the beginning stages of the disease, there may be no noticeable symptoms, so it’s important to have your eyes checked at least once a year, if you have diabetes.

Once symptoms of diabetic retinopathy do develop, they can include: dark or black spots in your visual field, or blurry vision, and it increases over time. This is a result of bleeding at the back of the eye, which prevents a clear image from being transmitted from the retina to the brain.

Whether you have type 1, type 2, or even just gestational diabetes, you are at risk for developing diabetic retinopathy. The longer you have had the disease, the greater the risk. It is essential to keep your blood sugar levels under control to prevent vision loss, and this may require a trip back to your primary care physician.

Treating diabetic retinopathy can include vitrectomy, replacing the inner gel-like substance that supports the eyeball structure, and laser surgery.

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

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Most people between the ages of 40-45 start to have difficulty seeing up close. This is called Presbyopia and slowly progresses until about the age of 65. This is a normal change due to the lens in the eye hardening and losing flexibility.

Vuity is 1.25% pilocarpine. This is not a new drug. It has been on the market for decades and is used to temporarily shrink the pupil size. It is now being rebranded as a drop that can help improve near vision. How does this work? By shrinking the pupil size, physics tells us this can increase our depth of focus. This drop will not CURE presbyopia. It can improve it while the drop is active and the near blur will return when the dose wears off after approximately 4-6 hours. This drop is recommended for individuals ages 40-55.

Dosage: one drop in each eye once per day. Side effects: possible brown ache or a mild headache. The cost at this time is about $80-90 per month at most pharmacies and insurance does not apply.